Friday, June 17, 2011

A Comparison of the Daily Office in the 1662 and 1928 Prayer Books

Most comparisons of the 1662 and 1928 Prayer Books center around the Office for Holy Communion which is notably different between the two versions of Common Prayer. However, most do not consider the differences between the classic 1662 BCP and the 1928 BCP, which are less noticeable. While I prefer the 1662 form, I do not think that one is better than the other, both can be used by faithful Anglicans who wish to pray in the Common Prayer of our Church.

Scripture Sentences

The historic Anglican office begins with a reading of a sentence from Sacred Scripture. These were added in the 1552 version of the BCP. Note that the 1928 permits the service to begin at the opening versicles as does the permitted variations authorized by the Church of England. In the 1662 BCP, these are entirely penitential, and are as follows:

When the wicked man turneth away from his wickedness that he hath committed, and doeth that which is lawful and right, he shall save his soul alive. Ezek. xviii. 27.
I acknowledge my transgressions, and my sin is ever before me. Psalm li. 3.
Hide thy face from my sins, and blot out all mine iniquities. Psalm li. 9.
The sacrifices of God are a broken spirit: a broken and a contrite heart, O God, thou wilt not despise. Psalm li. 17.
Rend your heart, and not your garments, and turn unto the Lord your God: for he is gracious and merciful, slow to anger, and of great kindness, and repenteth him of the evil. Joel ii. 13.
To the Lord our God belong mercies and forgivenesses, though we have rebelled against him; neither have we obeyed the voice of the Lord our God, to walk in his laws which he set before us. Daniel ix. 9, 10.
O Lord, correct me, but with judgment; not in thine anger, lest thou bring me to nothing. Jer. x. 24. Psalm vi. 1.
Repent ye; for the Kingdom of Heaven is at hand. St. Matt. iii. 2.
I will arise and go to my father, and will say unto him, Father, I have sinned against heaven, and before thee, and am no more worthy to be called thy son. St. Luke xv. 18, 19.
Enter not into judgment with thy servant, O Lord; for in thy sight shall no man living be justified. Psalm cxliii. 2.
If we say that we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us; but if we confess our sins, God is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness. 1 St. John i. 8, 9.

However, in the 1928 BCP, the character of the sentences has changed (through various revisions of the BCP, the seasonal sentences started in 1892) to include a number of seasonal sentences tied to the Church year:

General

The LORD is in his holy temple: let all the earth keep silence before him. Hab. ii. 20.
I was glad when they said unto me, We will go into the house of the LORD. Psalm cxxii. 1.
Let the words of my mouth, and the meditation of my heart, be alway acceptable in thy sight, O LORD, my strength and my redeemer. Psalm xix. 14.
O send out thy light and thy truth, that they may lead me, and bring me unto thy holy hill, and to thy dwelling. Psalm xliii. 3.
Thus saith the high and lofty One that inhabiteth eternity, whose name is Holy; I dwell in the high and holy place, with him also that is of a contrite and humble spirit, to revive the spirit of the humble, and to revive the heart of the contrite ones. Isaiah lvii. 15.
The hour cometh, and now is, when the true worshippers shall worship the Father in spirit and in truth: for the Father seeketh such to worship him. St. John iv. 23.
Grace be unto you, and peace, from God our Father, and from the Lord Jesus Christ. Phil. i. 2.

Advent

Repent ye, for the Kingdom of heaven is at hand. St. Matt. iii. 2.
Prepare ye the way of the LORD, make straight in the desert a highway for our God. Isaiah xl. 3.

Christmas

Behold, I bring you good tidings of great joy, which shall be to all people. For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Saviour, which is Christ the Lord. St. Luke ii. 10, 11.

Epiphany

From the rising of the sun even unto the going down of the same my Name shall be great among the Gentiles; and in every place incense shall be offered unto my Name, and a pure offering: for my Name shall be great among the heathen, saith the LORD of hosts. Mal. i. 11.
Awake, awake; put on thy strength, O Zion; put on thy beautiful garments, O Jerusalem. Isaiah lii. 1.

Letn

Rend your heart, and not your garments, and turn unto the LORD your God: for he is gracious and merciful, slow to anger, and of great kindness, and repenteth him of the evil. Joel ii. 13.
The sacrifices of God are a broken spirit: a broken and a contrite heart, O God, thou wilt not despise. Psalm li. 17.
I will arise and go to my father, and will say unto him, Father, I have sinned against heaven, and before thee, and am no more worthy to be called thy son. St. Luke xv. 18, 19.

Good Friday

Is it nothing to you, all ye that pass by? behold, and see if there be any sorrow like unto my sorrow which is done unto me, wherewith the LORD hath afflicted me. Lam. i. 12.
In whom we have redemption through his blood, the forgiveness of sins, according to the riches of his grace. Eph. i. 7.

Easter

He is risen. The Lord is risen indeed. St. Mark xvi. 6; St. Luke xxiv. 34.
This is the day which the LORD hath made; we will rejoice and be glad in it. Psalm cxviii. 24.

Ascension

Seeing that we have a great High Priest, that is passed into the heavens, Jesus the Son of God, let us come boldly unto the throne of grace, that we may obtain mercy, and find grace to help in time of need. Heb. iv. 14, 16.

Pentecost

Ye shall receive power, after that the Holy Ghost is come upon you: and ye shall be witnesses unto me both in Jerusalem, and in all Jud├Ža, and in Samaria, and unto the uttermost part of the earth. Acts i. 8.
Because ye are sons, God hath sent forth the Spirit of his Son into your hearts, crying, Abba, Father. Gal. iv. 6.

Trinity

Holy, holy, holy, Lord God Almighty, which was, and is, and is to come. Rev. iv. 8.

While the inclusion of seasonal sentences in itself is not wrong, I prefer the 1662 penitential sentences. Although not an expressed intention of seasonal sentences, it tends to downplay the penitential aspect of the service. Anglo-Catholics have long complained of the penitential aspects of our liturgy and have sought to change them accordingly. However, it is very comforting to return to the Lord each day in full awareness of my sins.

Exhortation

The 1662 includes a long exhortation before the general confession:

Dearly beloved brethren, the Scripture moveth us, in sundry places, to acknowledge and confess our manifold sins and wickedness; and that we should not dissemble nor cloak them before the face of Almighty God our heavenly Father; but confess them with an humble, lowly, penitent, and obedient heart; to the end that we may obtain forgiveness of the same, by his infinite goodness and mercy. And although we ought, at all times, humbly to acknowledge our sins before God; yet ought we chiefly so to do, when we assemble and meet together to render thanks for the great benefits that we have received at his hands, to set forth his most worthy praise, to hear his most holy Word, and to ask those things which are requisite and necessary, as well for the body as the soul. Wherefore I pray and beseech you, as many as are here present, to accompany me with a pure heart, and humble voice, unto the throne of the heavenly grace, saying after me;

This biblically sound exhortation reminds us of the need to repent but also the benefit of absoultion. The 1928 has this exhortation (with a few changes) but also provides the shorter form:

LET us humbly confess our sins unto Almighty God.

I acknowledge from a practical viewpoint that the shorter form is very desirable and must confess that I have used this in my daily prayers. In public worship, however, I think it is much more benefitial for the community if the longer form is read. The permitted variations to the 1662 authorized by the Church of England provide for a shorter form of the exhortation.

Preces

The preces are the series of versicles and responses after the first Lord's Prayer. In the 1662 they are as such:

O Lord, open thou our lips.
Answer. And our mouth shall show forth thy praise.
Priest. O God, make speed to save us.
Answer. O Lord, make haste to help us.
Here all standing up, the Priest shall say,
Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Ghost;
Answer. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.
Priest. Praise ye the Lord.
Answer. The Lord's Name be praised.


However, the 1928 curiously omits the versicle and response, "O God, make speed to save us. R. O Lord, make haste to help us." And only has the following:

O Lord, open thou our lips.
Answer. And our mouth shall show forth thy praise.
Here, all standing up, the Minister shall say,
Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Ghost;
Answer. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.
Minister. Praise ye the Lord.
Answer. The Lord’s Name be praised


I never understood this deletion. The more logical choice if we are to eliminate either of the two versicles would be the first because in the old Rite it was the versicle proper to Matins while all the other offices began with, "O God,..." This is one of my main issues with the 1928, however, it is not a doctrinal issue and the 1928 form is perfectly acceptable, for me it is mainly an aesthetic quality lacking.

Venite

The 1662 orders Ps. 95, or the Venite, to be said or sung every day (except Easter), the psalm is said in full:

O come, let us sing unto the Lord : let us heartily rejoice in the strength of our salvation.
Let us come before his presence with thanksgiving : and shew ourselves glad in him with Psalms.
For the Lord is a great God : and a great King above all gods.
In his hand are all the corners of the earth : and the strength of the hills is his also.
The sea is his, and he made it : and his hands prepared the dry land.
O come, let us worship and fall down : and kneel before the Lord our Maker.
For he is the Lord our God : and we are the people of his pasture, and the sheep of his hand.
To day if ye will hear his voice, harden not your hearts : as in the provocation, and as in the day of temptation in the wilderness;
When your fathers tempted me : proved me, and saw my works.
Forty years long was I grieved with this generation, and said : It is a people that do err in their hearts, for they have not known my ways.
Unto whom I sware in my wrath : that they should not enter into my rest.
Glory be to the Father, and to the Son : and to the Holy Ghost;
As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be : world without end. Amen.


However, in the 1928 revision, the Venite is changed to include part of Ps. 95 and part of Ps. 96, thus eliminating the negative part of the psalm, notice the differences:

O Come, let us sing unto the LORD; * let us heartily rejoice in the strength of our salvation.
Let us come before his presence with thanksgiving; * and show ourselves glad in him with psalms.
For the LORD is a great God; * and a great King above all gods.
In his hand are all the corners of the earth; * and the strength of the hills is his also.
The sea is his, and he made it; * and his hands prepared the dry land.
O come, let us worship and fall down, * and kneel before the LORD our Maker.
For he is the Lord our God; * and we are the people of his pasture, and the sheep of his hand.
O worship the LORD in the beauty of holiness; * let the whole earth stand in awe of him.
For he cometh, for he cometh to judge the earth; * and with righteousness to judge the world, and the people with his truth.

In addition to changing the text of the Venite, the 1928 also adds seasonal antiphons to be said before and after the Psalm.

On the days hereafter named, here may be sung or said:
On the Sundays in Advent. — Our King and Saviour draweth nigh : O come, let us adore him.
On Christmas Day and until the Epiphany. — Alleluia. Unto us a child is born : O come, let us adore him.
On the Epiphany and seven days after, and on the Feast of the Transfiguration. — The Lord hath manifested forth his glory : O come, let us adore him.
On Monday in Easter Week, and until Ascension Day. — Alleluia. The Lord is risen indeed : O come let us adore him. Alleluia.
On Ascension Day and until Whitsunday. — Alleluia. Christ the Lord ascended into heaven : O come, let us adore him. Alleluia.
On Whitsunday and six days after. — Alleluia. The Spirit of the Lord filleth the world : O come, let us adore him. Alleluia.
On Trinity Sunday. — Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, One God : O come, let us adore him.
On the Purification and the Annunciation.—The Word was made flesh : O come, let us adore him.
On other Festivals for which a proper Epistle and Gospel are ordered. — The Lord is glorious in his saints : O come, let us adore him.


Somehow, the thought of adding antiphons to the reformed Office of the Church of England strikes me as going against the desire of the Reformers. I do take issue with the "de-penetentialization" of the Venite in the 1928, one should read Ps 95 in its entirety instead of the hybrid canticle.

Gloria

The 1662 BCP, like the medieval service books, appoints the Gloria Patri to be said after every Psalm and canticle,

Then shall follow the Psalms in order as they be appointed. And at the end of every Psalm throughout the year, and likewise at the end of Benedicite, Benedictus, Magnificat, and Nunc dimittis, shall be repeated,
Glory be to the Father, and to the Son : and to the Holy Ghost;
Answer. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be : world without end. Amen.


The 1928 BCP, however, allows it to be said at the end of the portions of Psalms or to be substituted by the Gloria in excelsis,

Then shall follow a Portion of the PSALMS, according to the Use of this Church. And at the end of every Psalm, and likewise at the end of the Venite, Benedictus es, Benedictus, Jubilate, may be, and at the end of the whole Portion, or Selection from the Psalter, shall be, sung or said the Gloria Patri:

It seems more in catholic usage to say the Gloria Patri after every Psalm and Canticle. The canticles at Morning and Evening Prayer are mostly the same. However, the 1928 allows for the shorter canticle, Benedictus es Domine, to be said instead of either the Te Deum or Benedicte, omnia opera, a practical change which is not bad.

The Prayers

The 1928 allows the recitation of the Nicene Creed instead of the Apostle's at the Daily Offices.

The next big change happens after the Creed, the 1662 appoints,

The Lord be with you.
Answer. And with thy spirit.
Minister. Let us pray.
Lord, have mercy upon us.
Christ, have mercy upon us.
Lord, have mercy upon us.

Our Father, which art in heaven, Hallowed be thy Name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done in earth, As it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our trespasses, As we forgive them that trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, But deliver us from evil. Amen.

O Lord, shew thy mercy upon us.
Answer. And grant us thy salvation.
Priest. O Lord, save the Queen.
Answer. And mercifully hear us when we call upon thee.
Priest. Endue thy Ministers with righteousness.
Answer. And make thy chosen people joyful.
Priest. O Lord, save thy people.
Answer. And bless thine inheritance.
Priest. Give peace in our time, O Lord.
Answer. Because there is none other that fighteth for us, but only thou, O God.
Priest. O God, make clean our hearts within us.
Answer. And take not thy Holy Spirit from us.


The 1928 drastically alters this,

The Lord be with you.
And with thy spirit.
Let us pray.

Here, if it hath not already been said, shall follow the Lord's Prayer.

Minister.O Lord, show thy mercy upon us.
Answer. And grant us thy salvation.
Minister. O God, make clean our hearts within us.
Answer. And take not thy Holy Spirit from us.


This reduction probably comes from the 1785 proposed BCP's reliance on the 1689 liturgy of Comprehension which sought to reduce the length of some of the services in the 1662 BCP like the Lord's Prayer, which on a Communion Sunday in England would have been said five times. However, in Evening Prayer, the 1928 BCP uses the longer form as in the 1662.

The Collect of the day and two following collects are the same, however, the 1928 has added a number of Collects and changed a few (such as the Collect for Good Friday).

Obviously the state collects are different:

A Prayer for the Queen's Majesty.
O LORD, our heavenly Father, the high and mighty, King of kings, Lord of lords, the only Ruler of princes, who dost from thy throne behold all the dwellers upon earth; Most heartily we beseech thee with thy favour to behold our most gracious Sovereign Lady, Queen ELIZABETH; and so replenish her with the grace of thy Holy Spirit, that she may always incline to thy will, and walk in thy way. Endue her plenteously with heavenly gifts; grant her in health and wealth long to live; strengthen her that she may vanquish and overcome all her enemies; and finally, after this life, she may attain everlasting joy and felicity; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

A Prayer for the Royal Family.
ALMIGHTY God, the fountain of all goodness, we humbly beseech thee to bless Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, Charles, Prince of Wales, and all the Royal Family: Endue them with thy Holy Spirit; enrich them with thy heavenly grace; prosper them with all happiness; and bring them to thine everlasting kingdom; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

A Prayer for the Clergy and People.
ALMIGHTY and everlasting God, who alone workest great marvels; Send down upon our Bishops, and Curates, and all Congregations committed to their charge, the healthful Spirit of thy grace; and that they may truly please thee, pour upon them the continual dew of thy blessing. Grant this, O Lord, for the honour of our Advocate and Mediator, Jesus Christ. Amen.

A Prayer of St. Chrysostom.
ALMIGHTY God, who hast given us grace at this time with one accord to make our common supplications unto thee; and dost promise, that when two or three are gathered together in thy Name thou wilt grant their requests; Fulfil now, O Lord, the desires and petitions of thy servants, as may be most expedient for them; granting us in this world knowledge of thy truth, and in the world to come life everlasting. Amen.

2 Corinthians xiii.
THE grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, and the love of God, and the fellowship of the Holy Ghost, be with us all evermore. Amen.


Reflecting the American political situation, the 1928 offers,

A Prayer for The President of the United States, and all in Civil Authority.

O LORD, our heavenly Father, the high and mighty Ruler of the universe, who dost from thy throne behold all the dwellers upon earth; Most heartily we beseech thee, with thy favour to behold and bless thy servant THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, and all others in authority; and so replenish them with the grace of thy Holy Spirit, that they may always incline to thy will, and walk in thy way. Endue them plenteously with heavenly gifts; grant them in health and prosperity long to live; and finally, after this life, to attain everlasting joy and felicity; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Or this.

O LORD our Governor, whose glory is in all the world; We commend this nation to thy merciful care, that being guided by thy Providence, we may dwell secure in thy peace. Grant to THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, and to all in Authority, wisdom and strength to know and to do thy will. Fill them with the love of truth and righteousness; and make them ever mindful of their calling to serve this people in thy fear; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Ghost, one God, world without end. Amen.

A Prayer for the Clergy and People.

ALMIGHTY and everlasting God, from whom cometh every good and perfect gift; Send down upon our Bishops, and other Clergy, and upon the Congregations committed to their charge, the healthful Spirit of thy grace; and, that they may truly please thee, pour upon them the continual dew of thy blessing. Grant this, O Lord, for the honour of our Advocate arid Mediator, Jesus Christ. Amen.

A Prayer for all Conditions of Men.

O GOD, the Creator and Preserver of all mankind, we humbly beseech thee for all sorts and conditions of men; that thou wouldest be pleased to make thy ways known unto them, thy saving health unto all nations. More especially we pray for thy holy Church universal; that it may be so guided and governed by thy good Spirit, that all who profess and call themselves Christians may be led into the way of truth, and hold the faith in unity of spirit, in the bond of peace, and in righteousness of life. Finally, we commend to thy fatherly goodness all those who are any ways afflicted, or distressed, in mind, body, or estate; [*especially those for whom our prayers are desired;] that it may please thee to comfort and relieve them, according to. their several necessities; giving them patience under their sufferings, and a happy issue out of all their afflictions. And this we beg for Jesus Christ’s sake. Amen.

A General Thanksgiving.

ALMIGHTY God, Father of all mercies, we, thine unworthy servants, do give thee most humble and hearty thanks for all thy goodness and loving-kindness to us and to all men; [*particularly to those who desire now to offer up their praises and thanksgivings for thy late mercies vouchsafed unto them.] We bless thee for our creation, preservation, and all the blessings of this life; but above all, for thine inestimable love in the redemption of the world by our Lord Jesus Christ; for the means of grace, and for the hope of glory. And, we beseech thee, give us that due sense of all thy mercies, that our hearts may he unfeignedly thankful; and that we show forth thy praise, not only with our lips, but in our lives, by giving up our selves to thy service, and by walking before thee in holiness and righteousness all our days; through Jesus Christ our Lord, to whom, with thee and the Holy Ghost, be all honour and glory, world without end. Amen.

Note, That the General Thanksgiving may be said by the Congregation with the Minister.

A Prayer of St. Chrysostom.

ALMIGHTY God, who hast given us grace at this time with one accord to make our common supplications unto thee; and dost promise that when two or three are gathered together in thy Name thou wilt grant their requests; Fulfil now, O Lord, the desires and petitions of thy servants, as may be most expedient for them; granting us in this world knowledge of thy truth, and in the world to come life everlasting. Amen.

2 Cor. xiii. 14.

THE grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, and the love of God, and the fellowship of the Holy Ghost, be with us all evermore. Amen.


I do find it curious that the 1928 did not follow the general structure of the English order here. Instead of offering pure state prayers, the 1928 offers a prayer for the president and then the prayer for All conditions of Men and the General thanksgiving which add a universal flavor to the Office which was lacking in the 1662 BCP.

The 1662 ordered the Creed of St. Athanasius to be said,

Upon these Feasts; Christmas Day, the Epiphany, Saint Matthias, Easter Day, Ascension Day, Whitsunday, Saint John Baptist, Saint James, Saint Bartholomew, Saint Matthew, Saint Simon and Saint Jude, Saint Andrew, and upon Trinity Sunday, shall be sung or said at Morning Prayer, instead of the Apostles' Creed, this Confession of our Christian Faith, commonly called the Creed of Athanasius

The American BCP tradition had omitted the Athanasian Creed since 1785.

Directions for US Anglicans Wishing to Use the 1662

If an American Anglican wishes to use the 1662 there are only a few places where there needs to be a change due to political differences.:
  1. In the litany, "O Lord, save the Queen," either substitute, "O Lord, save the State," (American) or "O Lord, defend our rulers" (Irish).

  2. In thte State Prayers, I printed out a card with the prayers from the 1928 or I skip them and only say the Prayer of St. Chrysostom and Grace (I do this when using the 1928 as well).

  3. The Litany, the petitions for the Queen must be dropped and petitions for the US government added, or a general petition for Christian rulers as in the 1892 US BCP.

Conclusion

In this post, I am not offering a suggestion for one form over the other but noting some differences between the books which are often overlooked when comparing the Offices of Holy Communion. I do think that Anglicans should use a form of Common Prayer. I can recommend the 1662 BCP, the 1928 American, the 1928 Proposed English, the 1926 Irish, the 2004 Irish, the 1962 Canadian, and the 2003 REC. There are probably other versions out there but as long as it follows our Common Prayer tradition it will be edifying.

10 comments:

wyclif said...

Well said. A quick observation under your heading "Directions for US Anglicans Wishing to Use the 1662."

The first change you note should properly be "O Lord, save the State" as this encompasses not only the President, but also the Congress, Senate, and all in the US Government.

Jordan said...

Thanks for the suggestion!

Duly edited.

Likewise, what would you say for those using the 1662 Litany? In place of the petitions for the Queen, the 1928 US BCP has a petition for the President, then Christian rulers, then clergy. One blogger suggests using the 1892 formula which prays for Christian magistrates and the clergy without elevating the US Presidency to the place of monarchy in the liturgy.

James said...

I just found your web log today, and I especially like reading posts like this. I have been using 1662 since Advent 2009 (almost two years now) and have come to prefer it over US 1928.

Personally, I prefer to say 'O Lord, save the Nation' as, in this case, 'save' means to preserve, and rightly or wrongly, I do not believe it desirable that the American State be preserved in its present form.

As for the Litany, I usually leave out the State petitions there (they really do not belong there, even in the US 1928) and resume with the clerical petitions, skipping the petition for the Lords and Nobility, commencing with "That it may please thee to bless and keep all Christian Rulers and Magistrates" (modifying it more along the lines of US 1928).

When the Litany is not said, I skip the State prayers, continue with the prayer for the clergy and people and add the Prayer for All Conditions and the General Thanksgiving, followed by the prayer of Saint Chrysostom and the Grace, following the example of the Irish and American prayer-books.

James said...

To clarify, when I said of the State petitions in the Litany 'they really do not belong there, even in the US 1928' I mean that they do not belong there because the Episcopal Church is not a state church. Obviously, in England they belong right where they are, but for practical and correct American usage things must be rearranged a bit.

Jordan said...

James,

Thanks for your comments!

I generally say the prayer for the Church, the Bishops and Clergy, and then for Christian Magistrates in the Litany.

mylifemyfaith said...

It's interesting to note that two of the worst oddities of the 1928 Prayer Book- the use of the Nicene Creed in the Daily Office, and the messing about with the Gloria, were both corrected in the 1979 BCP. I really think that the Daily office 1979 is a vast improvement on the 1928. 1662, I'm not so sure about.

The Hackney Hub said...

I rather do like Rite I from the 1979 BCP. Besides the clash with the modern Psalter, the only thing I dislike about it is the way the Te Deum was edited to leave out the last portion of the Canticle (now "Suffrages B" after the Lord's Prayer) and the deletion of the line "and there is no health in us" from the General Confession - a symptom of 1970's theology, in my book.

mylifemyfaith said...

When I use Rite I from the 1979 BCP I tend to read the psalms from either the King James Version or the old BCP psalter, precisely because of the clash between the language of the rite and the language of the psalter. This is allowable even in public worship- on page 14 it says "In any of the Proper Liturgies for Special Days, and in other services contained within this Book celebrated in the context of a Rite One service, the contemporary idiom may be conformed to traditional language." Of course, this requires printing up sheets containing the psalms, or having two prayer-books in your pews and making people switch between them.


I don't care for the changes in the Confession of Sin myself, either the new confession in Rite II or the deletion in Rite I.

The Hackney Hub said...

I share your concern with the Psalter when using Rite I. I read Morning Prayer at my parish on Monday mornings and I always use Rite I. The Psalter clashes with Rite I. But in the end there's not much we can do in public worship. I am trying to get authorization to use the 1928 Books that are sitting in a box in the closet. In private use I use either the 1662 or 1928.

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